Correct translation for "Zweikampfstärke" (and others) ?

Hi,

I am currently working on a scientific paper that deals with the application of a new ranking algorithm. In order to test this ranking, i decided to make a ranking that identifies the best player on the field. Therefore, i am looking for the correct translation for the german word "Zweikampfstärke" or "Zweikampf". I guess there is a soccer specific expression for it. Dictionaries translate it with "duel", but i don't think that that's the correct word.

Thanks.
 

Oldschool

Spielgestalter
Moderator
( ... ) I guess there is a soccer specific expression for it. Dictionaries translate it with "duel", but i don't think that that's the correct word.

Thanks.
Not soccer specific I think, at least I didn't find anything else. I found

1st "strength in duels"

or 2nd "dueling skills"

Hope I could help :huhu:
 
Where did you find that? A soccer board or something? I don't know why but duel sounds strange for me. Perhaps because the german foreign word "duell" what be the wrong translation for a "zweikampf" at soccer.

Well, I will probably just use duel and define what it means for me, something like: "a situation where two players and so on...."

Thanks.
 
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jambala

Moderator
Hello.

A common translation would be one-on-one skills (Zweikampfverhalten / Zweikampffähigkeiten / Zweikampfstärke) or one-on-one battle (Zweikampf in the sense of confrontation with the opponent during a match).

As you can read here: Soccer / Football Positions
 
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Hello.

A common translation would be one-on-one skills (Zweikampfverhalten / Zweikampffähigkeiten / Zweikampfstärke) or one-on-one battle (Zweikampf in the sense of confrontation with the opponent during a match).

As you can read here: Soccer / Football Positions

Perfect. Thanks.

@gilbertBrown: Da steht was von: "Nicht-englische Beiträge werden gelöscht.". Und macht ja mehr sinn so was Leute zu fragen, die sich auf englisch über Fussball unterhalten ;)

@untouchable: Doesn't tackle denote the process of taking off the ball? That is just one kind of Zweikampf.
 
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jambala

Moderator
One-on-one skills is used in a more general sense. Tackling itself is normally used for the direct confrontation on the ground when "tackling" the opponent, which means the fighting for the ball as an action. So players which are good tacklers may not be players with a good one-on-one skill. Like Bertie Vogts.
 
:suspekt:
My Glasgow visits told me "one-on-one skills" is hardly in use. I´d say its not in use connected with football at all. In Glasgow it´s definitely not. ;)
 

jambala

Moderator
Year, Glasgow iss tha capital of the inglish language... Every one who speaks english knows, that there are words which are used in common language (like quids for british pounds) and which aren't officially.
 

GilbertBrown

Green Bay Packers Owner
@gilbertBrown: Da steht was von: "Nicht-englische Beiträge werden gelöscht.". Und macht ja mehr sinn so was Leute zu fragen, die sich auf englisch über Fussball unterhalten ;)

ooops, i didn't pay attention to the used subforum as i usually click on "new posts" when i visit the message board. my fault.
 

Detti04

The Count
In my opinion there is no translation for "Zweikampf", i.e. one that precisely translates everything that "Zweikampf" includes in German. "One on one" is too broad a term as it e.g. also includes dribbling skills, (Messi would be good in the one on one), tackling is too narrow as it e.g. doesn't include any aerial strength. Famously, already Lizarazu knew about this semantic problem: "First, we have to win Zweikampf."
 
In my opinion there is no translation for "Zweikampf", i.e. one that precisely translates everything that "Zweikampf" includes in German. "One on one" is too broad a term as it e.g. also includes dribbling skills, (Messi would be good in the one on one), tackling is too narrow as it e.g. doesn't include any aerial strength. Famously, already Lizarazu knew about this semantic problem: "First, we have to win Zweikampf."

Important information. That's actually that what i suspected.
However, I like the term "one-by-one", and i am going to use it, even if it's not exactly "zweikampf".

Nevertheless, thank you.
 
Another powerfully expression in german that was translated 1:1 is for example -> Blitzkrieg

Yeah. There are even much more such words. For example Kindergarten (the kindergarten was apparently a german invention), Schatz (synonym for darling) or the well-known "german angst" (means Germany's cautious behavior regarding the war on terrorism).

There is somewhere on wikipedia a list with more of these words.
 
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Jonas

Gooner
I would use "challenge" or "50-50", personally. It's the one you're most likely to hear when watching Premier League games and player/manager interviews. Anything containing "skill" would probably refer to the attackers' dribbling skills for me, while tackle/tackling refers to the skills of the defender.

Example sentence for 50-50:

Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger revealed his delight after his side came from behind to beat Liverpool 2-1 at Anfield this afternoon.

“The first half was all Liverpool and we were quite happy with the 1-0, it could have been two and the game could have been over,” he told Sky Sports.

“We needed another performance in the second half and what we did, we gave a great performance. The first half was Liverpool, the second half was Arsenal.”

“We lost all the 50-50's and we know it was absolutely needed to win this game, to do it.

“When you lose all the 50-50's in the big games then you don't win the game and I just wanted to make the players conscious that the Liverpool commitment was stronger than ours.”


But I'd say that challenge is the most commonly used.
 

Detti04

The Count
The term 50-50 only describes cases where nobody is already in possession of the ball, e.g. the aerial fight for a cross or the running after a ball by two players, but it does not include the tackle, which is definitely included in "Zweikampf". Maybe "Zweikampf" is best described as tackle plus 50-50.
 

Jonas

Gooner
The term 50-50 only describes cases where nobody is already in possession of the ball, e.g. the aerial fight for a cross or the running after a ball by two players, but it does not include the tackle, which is definitely included in "Zweikampf". Maybe "Zweikampf" is best described as tackle plus 50-50.

Challenge would be the most fitting term i can think of then.
 
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